Question: How Can Nurses Prevent Nosocomial Infections?

What is infection prevention and control in nursing?

Infection prevention and control (IPC) is a practical, evidence-based approach which prevents patients and health workers from being harmed by avoidable infection and as a result of antimicrobial resistance..

What are 3 common examples of nosocomial infections?

Some well known nosocomial infections include: ventilator-associated pneumonia, Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Acinetobacter baumannii, Clostridium difficile, Tuberculosis, Urinary tract infection, Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus and Legionnaires’ disease.

What is the most common cause of nosocomial infections?

According to the CDC, the most common pathogens that cause nosocomial infections are Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and E. coli. Some of the common nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections, respiratory pneumonia, surgical site wound infections, bacteremia, gastrointestinal and skin infections.

Why are nosocomial infections higher in developing countries?

Nosocomial infections and their control are a world-wide challenge. The prevalence of nosocomial infections is generally higher in developing countries with limited resources than industrialized countries.

What are the sources of nosocomial infection?

Most frequent infection sites associated with nosocomial infection include urinary tract infection pneumonia, primary bloodstream, use of contaminated mechanical ventilation; urinary catheters are a source of nosocomial pneumonia and urinary tract infection respectively.

What is the most effective means in reducing nosocomial infections?

Hands are the most common vehicle for transmission of organisms and “hand hygiene” is the single most effective means of preventing the horizontal transmission of infections among hospital patients and health care personnel.[4]

What precautions do nurses take to prevent the spread of infections at hospitals?

The elements of standard precautions include hand hygiene, use of gloves and other barriers (such as a mask, eye protection, face shield, and gown), proper handling of patient-care equipment and linen, environmental control, prevention of injury from sharps devices, and patient placement (such as room assignments) …

How can we prevent nosocomial infections?

Wash Your Hands. Hand washing should be the cornerstone of reducing HAIs. … Create an Infection-Control Policy. … Identify Contagions ASAP. … Provide Infection Control Education. … Use Gloves. … Provide Isolation-Appropriate Personal Protective Equipment. … Disinfect and Keep Surfaces Clean. … Prevent Patients From Walking Barefoot.More items…•

What are the 3 methods of infection control?

There are three types of transmission-based precautions: contact, droplet, and airborne. Contact precautions are used in addition to standard precautions when caring for patients with known or suspected diseases that are spread by direct or indirect contact.

Which is the most common hospital acquired infection?

Hospital-acquired infections are caused by viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens; the most common types are bloodstream infection (BSI), pneumonia (eg, ventilator-associated pneumonia [VAP]), urinary tract infection (UTI), and surgical site infection (SSI).

How can nurses prevent infections?

Clinical care nurses directly prevent infections by performing, monitoring, and assuring compliance with aseptic work practices; providing knowledgeable collaborative oversight on environmental decontamination to prevent transmission of microorganisms from patient to patient; and serve as the primary resource to …

Who is most at risk for nosocomial infections?

All hospitalized patients are susceptible to contracting a nosocomial infection. Some patients are at greater risk than others-young children, the elderly, and persons with compromised immune systems are more likely to get an infection.

What is another name for a nosocomial infection?

A nosocomial infection is contracted because of an infection or toxin that exists in a certain location, such as a hospital. People now use nosocomial infections interchangeably with the terms health-care associated infections (HAIs) and hospital-acquired infections.

What are the 10 standard precautions?

Standard PrecautionsHand hygiene.Use of personal protective equipment (e.g., gloves, masks, eyewear).Respiratory hygiene / cough etiquette.Sharps safety (engineering and work practice controls).Safe injection practices (i.e., aseptic technique for parenteral medications).Sterile instruments and devices.More items…

What is the single most important factor in preventing someone against infection?

“Clean hands are the single most important factor in preventing the spread of dangerous germs and antibiotic resistance in health care settings,” said Dr. Julie Gerberding, director of the CDC.

What is the role of nurse in prevention of nosocomial infection?

Nurses play a crucial role in preventing and controlling transmission of the infection through the application of standard precautions and maintenance of the health care environment. In hospitals, infected patients are a source of infection transmission to other patients, health care workers, and visitors.

What is the most important step that the nurse can take to prevent the transmission of microorganisms in the hospital setting?

Following standard precautions not only protects patients, but also healthcare workers. Hand hygiene is the number one weapon in preventing the spread of microorganisms and includes alcohol-based hand rubs and hand washing with soap and water.

What are five things that increase the risk of nosocomial infection?

Risk factors for nosocomial infection were recorded as age, sex, cause of admission to the ICU, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score of patients on admission to the ICU, any underlying diseases, surgical history, use of H2 receptor antagonists, central and/or peripheral intravenous …